OK In Health - Glorious Garden Gems

Benefits of Edible Perennial Plants - May 2017

By Lindsay Coulter

Asparagus

The delicious benefits of edible perennial plants

I aspire to eat more local foods — out of my own garden, if possible.
So I took a perennial vegetables workshop by Solara of Hatchet and Seed @hatchetnseed. She introduced me to a new term, "edimentals" — edible, ornamental plants — and supplied a list.

Perennial vegetables are great because they:

Keep coming back!
Withstand pests better than annuals
Build and improve soil quality
Don't need tilling, leaving mycelial culture (mushrooms and other fungi) and soil structure intact
Increase aeration and water absorption
Create compost, add to topsoil and bring up nutrients from deep down when dropped leaves die back each year

Are edimentals — delicious AND beautiful!

Artichokes
Need a warm, protected spot. Varieties include globe and cardoon (wild). Blanch stalks and eat them cooked, too! Warning: sunchokes or Jerusalem artichoke spread.

Asparagus
Buy crowns or start from seed. From seed to shoot takes three years! Before prepping your bed, think long-term (they live up to 40 years) and keep soil mounded.

Caucasian spinach
Grows well in shade. Eat shoots.

Chufa (a.k.a. tiger nut)
A sedge tuber found in wet areas. Popular in Spain.

Cinnamon yams (a.k.a. air potato or Chinese yam)
Grow in pots (even an old bath tub) since tubers are large and will go deep. Use the vine to create shade.

Daubenton kale
Hardy plant that grows more than two metres tall. Extremely nutritious due to many years accumulating minerals. Great flavour. Tender enough to eat raw.

Day lilies
Edible before flowers open. (Read about all edible parts.)

Earth chestnut
Easily grown from seed. Eat greens (similar to parsley) and crunchy tubers.

Garden giant mushrooms
Seed into wood chip paths. Edible at the "button mushroom" phase. Don't eat a lot!

Good King Henry
Enjoys shade. Eat shoots. Looks like spinach.

Ground nut
A nitrogen-fixing ground tuber with climbing vines. Native to the East Coast. Contains 16 per cent protein (potatoes are five per cent protein).

Hops
Eat shoots in spring.

Hosta
Edible early before leaves get big (when it looks a bit like asparagus).

Elephant garlic
A perennial leek. Eat as you would leeks or harvest entire bulbs.

Leaf celery (a.k.a pink plume)
Stronger tasting than celery. Leaves are great in soups.

Mashua
From the Andes. A single tuber costs about $3.50. Flowers and leaves are edible. Similar to oca.

Nettle (a.k.a. stinging nettle)
Best in early spring. Easy to grow from seed. Prefers a moist, shady area. Cook young leaves like spinach or use in tea. A popular dye plant. Promotes good soil. Great in compost but not very kid-friendly.

Oca
From the Andes. Needs full sun but can survive in partial shade. Harvest the bulb after frost, once above-ground greens die back. Once harvested, lay in the sun to sweeten. Prepare as you would potatoes.

Perennial onion
All parts are edible, even flowers! Varieties include Welsh, garlic chives and walking onions. Bees love 'em!

Rhubarb
Only eat stalks — leaves and roots are toxic. Compost leaves. Happy near a compost heap!

Skirret (a.k.a. sweet root)
Related to dill, parsley, celery, cilantro and carrot. Shoots and roots taste like parsnip.

Sorrel
Great in soups or pesto! The French variety grows in clumps.

Turkish rocket
Eat shoots, flowers and leaves. Beware: This spreads!

Yakon
This giant tuber from South America is a heavy feeder and gets tall. Harvest after frost. Pot in winter, replant in spring!

Perennial plants:
Are often long-lived — e.g., asparagus lives up to 40 years!
Create resilience when planted from seed (avoid moulds, pests and diseases from nursery plants)
Use microclimates around trees
Can be left all winter

Which perennials will you grow?

Sincerely, 
Lindsay Coulter, a fellow Queen of Green

Subscribe to the Queen of Green digest




Lindsay  Coulter Lindsay 's Bio: David Suzuki's Queen of Green, Lindsay Coulter, answers your green living questions and offers tips and recipes to make your life easier on the environment. It's all about green living made easy. Continue the conversation: read Queen of Green blog - Lindsay Coulter Website


Celtic Healings Intuitive Readings with Maria O'Farrell Carr

Copyright © 2004- 2011 OKinHealth.com. This article is of the copyright of OK in Health and the author; any reproduction, duplication and transmission of the article are to have prior written approval by OK in Health or the author.

IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER
This information and research is intended to be reliable, but its accuracy cannot be guaranteed. All material in this article is provided for information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this newsletter / e-magazine / website. Readers should consult their doctor and other qualified health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being. The information and opinions provided in this newsletter / e-magazine/website are believed to be accurate and sound, based on the best judgment available to the authors. Readers who fail to consult with appropriate health authorities assume the risk of any injuries. The publisher is not responsible for any errors or omissions. OK in Health is not responsible for the information in these articles or for any content included in this article which is intended as a guide only and should not be used as a substitute to seeking professional advice from either your doctor or a registered specialist for yourself or anyone else.
Connect with Us
facebook    twitter

Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Wellness Tip
Five Blocks to Better Health
There are 336 30-minute blocks of time in one week. The American Heart Association recommends that you commit five or more "blocks" to exercise. In the time it takes you to watch five sit-coms you could be on your way to better health!


Body & Soul Wellness Fair - Vernon - March 2018


Wellness Directory
Celtic Wisdom Keeper, Healer and Intuitive Readings with Maria O'Farrell Carr, AEP
Specialty: Angel Empowerment Practitioner
Maria is a very powerful and gifted healer, Celtic Wisdom Keeper, Angel & Fairy Card Reader and medical intuitive. Maria works a Expos and with clients thru Skype or by phone
View Details


Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Event
Hot Stone Massage Certificate Course (Fort St. John)
Date: Dec 8, 2017
Location: Interior & Northern BC
Learn basic techniques of hot stone massage & receive a group breath integration session to help you move forward in consciousness. Fun & interesting course with lots of hands-on!
View Details


Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours


Article
How to Achieve Happiness in 5 steps
We all enjoy life so much more when we are feeling happy and fulfilled. I believe that we will live longer and stronger if our personal purpose is joy. Happiness is not bought nor is it given. It is something we must reach out for and create in our own lives. It has no monetary value, but the value it does have is priceless....
Full Article


Celtic Healings Intuitive Readings with Maria O'Farrell Carr


Recipe
Oh So Good Salsa
Category: Raw Foods
Description: This eay to make Salsa is a raw food recipe. Tomato salsa, if prepared using fresh ingredients, has several health benefits. Tomatoes contain large amounts of vitamin C and beta carotene. Because of the fresh ingredients, you can include tomato salsa as one of your suggested four vegetable servings per day. Just 1/4 cup of fresh tomato salsa counts as a single serving.
Full Recipe


Maria's Ireland Sacred Tours