Dips

 

 

Salba Irish Hummus 

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Description:
Hummus is a chickpea paste that is popular in various local forms throughout the Middle Eastern world, but its origins are unknown. In Arabic the word hummus is used to describe the dish or just chickpeas.

Salba seed is actually what you are seeing on commericals for chia pets.The salba seed is the richest whole food source of fiber and omega 3 fatty acids found in nature. The seed is flavorless and odorless. The salba seed is the only ancient grain for which there are acute and long term human nutritional studies. The salba seed is one of the most nutritional packed foods in the world. It has been labeled " the super grain." It has 6x the calcium of milk
- 3x the antioxidant strength of blueberries- 2x the potassium of bananas- 3x more iron that spinach- 8x the omega 3 fatty acids of salmon- 2.5x the vegetable protein of kidney beans- 15x the magnesium of broccoli- 1.1x the fiber of bran- half the folate of asparagusd and aids in digestion.


Ingredients:
•1 cup chickpeas from a can, drained
•1/2 lemon, juice
•1 gloves garlic
•1/4 cup olive oil
•1/4 cup sunflower oil
•1 cup fresh parsley, (keep some parsley to garnish)
•1/4 teaspoon chilli powder
•1/2 cup water
•1/2 teaspoon unrefined sea salt
•2 tablespoon Salba®, whole seed


Directions:
Mix all the ingredients with a blender until it’s smooth and creamy. Garnish with parsley. Serve with toast, crackers or vegetable sticks.


Notes: This is not a gluten free recipe!


Special Diet: High Protein, High Omega Fats


Category: Dips

Submitted By: OK In Health



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