Fish

 

 

Potato-Rosemary Crusted Fish Fillets 

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Description:
This simple fish dish is quite elegant with its subtle flavor of rosemary. Don’t worry about a few shreds of potato that remain in the skillet. Serve them over the fish. Pair this entrée with steamed asparagus and a large green salad with tomatoes or serve with steamed rice or vegetables.

Ingredients:
12 ounces thick fish filet, such as cod or halibut, cut in half
1 small potato, about 5 ounces
Salt and black pepper to taste
1/4 teaspoon dried rosemary leaves, crushed
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil


Directions:
1. Rinse the fish under cold running water and pat dry. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

2. Peel the potato and grate on the large holes of a grater. Squeeze excess water out of the potato by pressing between sheets of paper towel.

3. Season the potato with salt, pepper and rosemary and press it around the fish.

4. Heat a pre seasoned cast iron frying pan over medium-high heat and add olive oil. Gently slide the fish into the pan. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes. Turn fish over, using two spatulas, and cook for 3 to 5 minutes more or until potatoes are golden and fish is done.


Servings: 2


Notes: Per Serving Calories: 307.0 Protein: 34.1 grams Fat: 12.5 grams Saturated Fat: 2.0 grams Monounsat Fat: 7.3 grams Polyunsat Fat: 2.3 grams Carbohydrate: 13.3 grams Fiber: 1.2 grams Cholesterol: 67.3 mg Vitamin A: 284.4 IU Vitamin E: 2.0 mg/IU Vitamin C: 20.9 mg Calcium: 20.1 mg Magnesium: 59.1 mg


Special Diet: High Protein, High Omega Fats, Diabetic - Low Carb


Category: Fish

Submitted By: OK In Health



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