Holiday Recipes

 

 

Roast Turkey with Apple, Sausage, and Herb Stuffing 

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Description:
Traditional roast turkey is still the dish of choice for most holidays and evokes images of celebrations with family and friends. This is the season for enjoying turkey.
Health Benefits of Turkey is that is a lean meat and is a very good source of protein. A four ounce serving provides 65% of the daily value for protein, along with 11% of the daily value for saturated fat, about half the amount of saturated fat found in red meat. The structure of the human body is built on protein. We use animal and plant sources of protein for our amino acids and rearrange the nitrogen to make the pattern of amino acids we require. Turkey is a very good source of selenium, B vitamin and niacin.


Ingredients:
6.5 Kg (14 lb) turkey*
4 sprigs fresh rosemary and/or thyme

Stuffing - ingredients

125 g (1/4 lb) bulk turkey sausage
1.5 L (6 cups) day-old whole-wheat bread cubes (about 9 slices)
125 mL (1/2 cup) chopped celery
125 mL (1/2 cup) chopped onion
2 small apples, peeled, chopped (McIntosh in the fall; Golden Delicious in winter)
25 mL (2 tbsp) each chopped fresh sage and basil, (or 2 mL/1/2 tsp each dried)
7 mL (1 1/2 tsp) dried savory
10 mL (2 tsp) chopped fresh thyme or oregano
2 mL (1/2 tsp) or less each salt and freshly ground pepper


Directions:
Remove neck and giblets from body cavity of turkey. Discard gizzard and heart.
Cover and refrigerate neck and liver for gravy.
Rinse turkey under cold running water; dry skin and cavities with paper towels.
In small nonstick skillet, create stuffing by cooking sausage over medium heat for 5 to 7minutes or until no longer pink, breaking up meat with fork. In large bowl, combine sausage, bread, celery, onion, apples, sage, basil, savory, thyme, salt and pepper.
Loosely stuff neck and body cavity with stuffing. Fold neck skin over cavity and skewer to back.
Secure legs by tying together with string. Lift wings and fold behind back or tie to sides of turkey with string.
Place rosemary and/or thyme sprigs between body of turkey and each leg and wing.
Place turkey, breast side up, on rack in roasting pan. Cover with loose tent of lightly greased foil, shiny side down, leaving sides open.
Roast in 160°C (325°F) oven for 3 3/4 to 4 hours or until juices run clear when turkey is pierced and thermometer inserted into thigh reads 82°C (180°F).
Remove foil for last 30 minutes of cooking so turkey can brown.
Remove from oven and let stand, covered with foil, for 20 to 30 minutes before carving.


Servings: Makes 14 servings


Nutrient Information:
100 g (3.5 oz) skinless light meat with 125 mL (1/2 cup) stuffing Calories: 223 Protein: 33 Total fat: 5 g Saturated fat: 1 g Cholesterol: 74 mg Carbohydrate: 11 g Fibre: 2 g Sodium: 283 mg Potassium: 407 mg


Notes: *NOTE : Avoid pre-basted turkeys or ones injected with fat. You are paying a high price for added fat, which is usually hydrogenated or saturated. From Anne Lindsay’s Lighthearted at Home©2010 Note* Refrigerated raw turkey can keep for one or two days while cooked turkey will keep for about four days. Remember to always store the turkey meat separately from any stuffing or gravy you have prepared.


Special Diet: High Protein, Low Calorie, Diabetic - Low Carb


Category: Holiday Recipes

Submitted By: OK In Health E-Magazine



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Tuscan Leek & Bean Soup
Category: Soup
Description: Welcome those crisp winter days with a pot of hearty Tuscan bean soup. Leeks are a unique combination of flavonoids and sulfur-containing nutrients, the allium vegetables belong in your diet on a regular basis. Like their allium cousins, onions and garlic, let leeks sit for at least 5 minutes after cutting and before cooking to enhance their health-promoting qualities.
A good source of dietary fiber, leeks also contain goodly amounts of folic acid, calcium, potassium, and vitamin C. Easier to digest than standard onions, leeks have laxative, antiseptic, diuretic, and anti-arthritic properties.
Leeks contain many noteworthy flavonoid anti-oxidants, minerals, and vitamins that have proven health benefits.
Leeks are low in calories. 100 g fresh stalks contain 61 calories. Further, their elongated stalks provide good amounts of soluble and insoluble fiber.
Laboratory studies show that allicin reduces cholesterol production by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase enzyme in the liver cells. Further, it also found to have anti-bacterial, anti-viral and anti-fungal activities.
Allicin also decreases blood vessel stiffness by release of nitric oxide (NO); thereby bring reduction in the total blood pressure. It also blocks platelet clot formation and has fibrinolytic action in the blood vessels, which helps decrease overall risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral vascular diseases (PVD), and stroke.
Leeks are great source of minerals and vitamins that are essential for optimum health. Their leafy stems indeed contain several vital vitamins such as pyridoxine, folic acid, niacin, riboflavin, and thiamin in healthy proportions. 100 g fresh stalks provide 64 µg of folates. Folic acid is essential for DNA synthesis and cell division. Their adequate levels in the diet during pregnancy can help prevent neural tube defects in the newborn babies.
In addition, leeks are one of the good source of vitamin A (1667 IU or 55% of RDA per 100 g) and other flavonoid phenolic anti-oxidants such as carotenes, xanthin, and lutein. They also have some other essential vitamins such as vitamin C, K, and vitamin E. Vitamin C helps body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful, pro-inflammatory free radicals. Further, its stalks have small amounts of minerals such as potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, and selenium.
Often overlooked in leeks is their important concentration of the B vitamin folate. Folate is present in leeks in one of its bioactive forms (5-methyltetrahydrofolate, or 5MTHF) and it is present throughout the plant (including the full leaf portion, not only the lower leaf and bulb).
Fresh leeks should be stored unwashed and untrimmed in the refrigerator, where they will keep fresh for between one and two weeks. Wrapping them loosely in a plastic bag will help them to retain moisture.
Tips for Preparing Leeks - Cut off green tops of leeks and remove outer tough leaves. Cut off root and cut leeks in half lengthwise. Fan out the leeks and rinse well under running water, leaving them intact. Cut leeks into 2-inch lengths. Holding the leek sections cut side up, cut lengthwise so that you end up with thin strips, known as the chiffonade cut, slicing until you reach the green portion. Make sure slices are cut very thin to shorten cooking time. Let leeks sit for at least 5 minutes before cooking.
With a more delicate and sweeter flavor than onions, leeks add a subtle touch to recipes without overpowering the other flavors that are present. Although leeks are available throughout the year they are in season from the fall through the early part of spring when they are at their best.
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