Raw Foods

 

 

Brazil Nut and Chia Seeds Cookies 

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Description:
If you make your own nut milk, (see nut milk recipe below) this recipe is great for using up the leftover nut pulp. It is a rich source of protein, fiber and omega oils. This recipe can be used as part of a raw food diet.

Ingredients:
Basic Recipe:
Apx 2 cups Brazil nut pulp from making nut milk
3-4 Tbsp Agave syrup
3 Tbsp coconut oil
Pinch of salt
3 Tbsp chia seed soaked in 1 cup water till thickened


Directions:
Mix all ingredients together and use in one of the following “variations”.
Drop dough by small spoonfuls onto teflex or parchment lined dehydrator trays. Press dough to flatten. Dehydrate at 105 degrees for apx 12 hours or till desired crispness of cookie. Halfway through dehydrating, take cookies off the teflex / parchment sheets and continue to dehydrate till desired doneness.

Variations for cookies:

Ginger Snaps:
To basic recipe add:
1 tsp cinnamon powder, 1 tsp ground clove, 1 ½ tsp ginger powder, ¼ cup molasses, more agave syrup to desired sweetness

Chocolate Cookies:
To basic recipe add:
2-3 Tbsp raw cacao powder, more agave to desired sweetness, cacao nibs and or chopped nuts if desired

“Graham Cracker” / Cinnamon cookies:
To basic recipe add:
1 tsp raw cacao powder and 1 tsp cinnamon powder
These can be made into individual cookies or spread into a square and scored to make squares or shapes

Orange Spice Cookies:
To basic recipe add:
¼ cup lemon juice, 1 orange (peeled), ½ tsp cinnamon
Blend orange with lemon juice and add to pulp and cinnamon.


Notes: Brazil Nut Milk Soak 2 cups of Brazil nuts in water overnight (8-12 hours). Drain off water and rinse nuts. Put nuts and 6 cups of water in a Vita Mix and blend several minutes. Pour contents into a large bowl lined with a nut milk bag or a clean cotton cloth (t-shirt). Squeeze liquid into bowl. Add agave syrup to taste (aprox. ¼ cup) and pinch of salt if desired. Makes about 1½ - 2 quarts nut milk. Store in container (preferably glass) in frig. Will keep for 4-5 days. Save brazil nut pulp for other recipes.


Special Diet: High Protein, High Fibre, Low Calorie, High Omega Fats


Category: Raw Foods

Submitted By: OK In Health E-Magazine



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