Salads

 

 

Fresh Chow Mein with Cabbage and Carrots 

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Description:
Fresh chow mein at home is delicious and easy. Well, technically this is Lo Mein, but most people will consider it Chow Mein. This recipe is made without meat, so it can go easily with any other stir fry dishes.



Ingredients:
1 Tbl oil
2 cups shredded cabbage
1 cup shredded carrots
1/2 bunch sliced green onions
1 lb fresh steamed thin chow mein noodles* (see Notes)
1 cup chicken broth (If you buy on, look for a Low Sodium)
1/4 cup soy sauce (Look for a Non-GMO product)
1/4 cup sesame oil
1/4 cup lo mein sauce or a vegetarian version


Directions:
In a large colander, run hot water through the steamed chow mein for about 30 seconds, separating the noodles and removing the excess flour. Set aside.

In large wok or pan, heat oil and add green onions, cabbage and carrots. Stir fry for about 2-4 minutes, or until the cabbage is wilted.

Add the chow mein noodles and 1/2 cup of chicken broth. Cook stirring and tossing constantly for about 30 seconds and then add the remaining chicken broth. Cook for another minute or so or until all the liquid is dissolved.

Add the remaining ingredients, soy sauce, sesame oil and lo mein sauce, and continue to cook for another 2 minutes. Remove from heat and serve.

Variation: You can also choose at this point to brown it by spreading the noodles on the pan and cooking on high for about 1-2 minutes without moving or stirring the noodles. Flip over onto a plate and serve.



Notes: *Note: Fresh steamed chow mein is only partially cooked and can be found in the refrigerated section at most Asian markets. If you can’t find fresh chow mein noodles, then use the dried noodles by cooking them first and remove about 1 minute before the package directions. Drain them and rinse with cold water. If using fully cooked noodles, reduce the chicken broth to 1/4 cup. *Vegetarian? Replace the Lo Mein sauce with a vegetarian version.


Category: Salads


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