Side Dishes



Coconut Cauliflower Turmeric Rice 

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One of the best things about Winter is the food, hands down. After a summer of grillin' and chillin', I am feeling a strong call from my stove - it's lonely, it needs some loving. Cauliflower rice totally rocks as an alternative to grains, but what if we could kick it up a notch, maybe give it a little Indian/Thai flavor so that is pairs perfectly with curried chicken and veggies? The answer lies below (and it's delicious).

In addition to being a super low-carb version of a pantry staple, cauliflower is packed with Fiber, Vitamin C, Magnesium, and Vitamin B-6. Even though coconut milk and coconut oil are high in fat, it's the best kind of fat out there. Also, coconut has a plethora of health and beauty benefits including a slimmer waistline, shinier hair, and clear, luminous skin. As a bonus, the cardamom in this dish has detoxifying and anti-inflammatory properties.

1 medium cauliflower
1 finely diced shallot
½ tablespoon coconut oil
½ teaspoon ground cardamom
½ teaspoon ground Turmeric
¾ cup lite coconut milk
sea salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Chop the cauliflower into florets. Add to food processor/Vitamix and pulse until cauliflower looks like rice. About 10-15 seconds of pulsing.
Heat a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat for 1-2 minutes. Add the coconut oil, melt, then add the onion. Saute until tender, about 5 minutes. Add the cardamom, turmeric and stir with a wooden spoon until fragrant, about 30 seconds.
Add the cauliflower and coconut milk, stirring to combine. Saute the cauliflower for about 10-12 minutes until the coconut milk is adsorbed.
Season with salt and pepper, serve and enjoy!

Special Diet: High Fibre

Category: Side Dishes

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Stuffed Mushroom Caps with Couscous
Category: Side Dishes
Description: Couscous is a mildly nutty-tasting grain that comes from North Africa. It makes a great stuffing, especially for a small cavity like a mushroom, because it's so moist. When the stuffed mushrooms are baked, the full flavor of the couscous and the mushrooms really come through. These will go fast!

Couscous is among the healthiest grain-based products. It has a glycemic load per gram 25% below that of pasta. It has a superior vitamin profile to pasta, containing twice as much riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, and folate, and containing four times as much thiamin and pantothenic acid. In terms of protein, couscous has 3.6g for every 100 calories, equivalent to pasta, and well above the 2.6g for every 100 calories of white rice. Furthermore, couscous contains a 1% fat-to-calorie ratio, compared to 3% for white rice, 5% for pasta, and 11.3% for rice pilaf.
In general, mushrooms are low in energy, virtually free of fat, a valuable source of fibre and are cholesterol and carbohydrate-free. Emerging research indicates that certain mushroom extracts, such as beta-glucans, may have a positive effect on the immune system. Medicinal properties have been attributed to mushrooms for thousands of year. Benefit to the immune system may be one of them.
Full Recipe

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