Side Dishes

 

 

Curried Greens with Tomatoes 

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Description:
This recipe calls for 1 pound spinach, kale, collards or beet greens (or mixture of all). When some people hear the word "greens", they immediately conjure up childhood memories of overcooked lumps of vegetation they were forced to eat and hated. But the vegetable section of the grocery or health store is a different world today, brimming with a variety of greens such as spinach, chard, kale, mustard, collards and bok choy that are tasty as well as excellent sources of vitamins and minerals. Iron, calcium and folic acid (an important B vitamin that helps prevent birth defects and offers protection from heart disease) are abundant in these leafy veggies.
Greens can have strong tastes, but we encourage you to experiment with varieties you've never tried or haven't had in a while. You'll be in for a pleasant surprise.


Ingredients:
1 pound spinach, kale, collards or beet greens (or mixture of all)
2 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
2-3 tablespoons curry powder
1 cup finely chopped tomatoes (fresh or canned)
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon dark-brown sugar
1 tablespoon expeller-pressed canola oil or olive oil
1 cup onion, finely diced
3/4 pound brown potatoes, peeled and cubed
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley (optional)


Directions:
1. Wash and drain greens, removing any coarse stems and midribs. Cut into half-inch strips.

2. In a small bowl, mix together the garlic, curry powder, tomatoes, tomato paste and sugar.

3. Heat the oil in a skillet and sauté onion over medium-high heat until it begins to brown. Add the spice-and-tomato mixture, mix well, and cook for a few minutes.

4. Add the potatoes and 2 cups water.

5. Mix well, bring to a boil, reduce heat, cover, and cook for 10 minutes.

6. Add greens and cook for 10 minutes more, or until potatoes are done.

7. Correct seasoning to taste. Garnish with the chopped fresh cilantro or parsley if desired.


Nutrient Information:
Per Serving Calories: 102.8 Protein: 3.5 grams Fat: 2.6 grams Saturated Fat: 0.2 grams Monounsat Fat: 1.3 grams Polyunsat Fat: 0.9 grams Carbohydrate: 18.6 grams Fiber: 4.1 grams Cholesterol: 0.0 mg Vitamin A: 5,138.3 IU Vitamin E: 2.0 mg/IU Vitamin C: 39.9 mg Calcium: 104.1 mg Magnesium: 76.1 mg


Special Diet: Gluten Free, Vegetarian, Low Sodium, High Iron, Low Fat, High Fibre, Low Calorie, Diabetic - Low Carb


Category: Side Dishes

Submitted By: OK In Health E-Magazine



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