Side Dishes

 

 

Sweet Potato Colcannon with Kale 

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Description:
An Irish slant on a Christmas or Thanksgiving side with a bit of a kick!
Traditionally in North America you might have sweet potatoes with marshmallows, roasted or in a casserole, so why not tip your hat to the Irish flag and create this Irish sweet potato colcannon. Traditionally colcannon is eaten at Halloween but it’s a wonderful dish to have at any time.

Sweet potatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A (in the form of beta-carotene). They are also a very good source of vitamin C, manganese, copper, pantothenic acid and vitamin B6. Additionally, they are a good source of potassium, dietary fiber, niacin, vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and phosphorus.

Sweet potatoes are naturally sweet-tasting but their natural sugars are slowly released into the bloodstream, helping to ensure a balanced and regular source of energy, without the blood sugar spikes linked to fatigue and weight gain.

Note: Grocery stores often have two types of labelling for sweet potatoes.
Yam — Soft sweet potato with a copper skin and deep orange flesh.
Sweet potato — Firm sweet potato with golden skin and lighter flesh.


Ingredients:
1/3 pound kale, rinsed well and stripped of coarse stems

1.5 pounds sweet potato, peeled and cut in 1/2-inch cubes

4 slices (1/8-inch thick) pancetta, diced (Optional)

4 tablespoons butter

1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped

1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper (or as much as 1/4 teaspoon, for more heat)

1/2 teaspoon Turmeric

1/2 cup half-and-half salt and pepper to taste


Directions:
Boil sweet potato (Pale ones) in water for 15 minutes or until tender.

Drain and pass through a potato ricer or food mill or mash, into a large, heat-proof pot.

Add the chopped kale to the sweet potato. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

In a medium skillet, over moderate heat, cook the pancetta until crisp but not browned.

In the same pan you used to cook the pancetta, melt the butter. Add onion and cayenne pepper and sauté.

Over moderate heat, until onion is translucent and has lost its crunch. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, heat half-and-half, then beat into the sweet potato-kale mixture. Add the pancetta. Add the onion and the fat from the pan. Combine all ingredients well, and keep warm. Serve Hot


Servings: Serves 4-6


Special Diet: Celiac


Category: Side Dishes


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