Slow Cooker!

 

 

Braised Chicken Slow Cooker/Crock Pot Recipe 

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Description:
This slow cooker chicken recipe is great to make the night before or in the morning and it will be already for you at the end of the day. You may add some extra vegetable to this dish or cook separately.
Chicken is rated as a very good source of protein, providing 67.6% of the daily value for protein in 4 ounces. The structure of humans and animals is built on protein. We derive our amino acids from animal and plant sources of protein, then rearrange the nitrogen to make the pattern of amino acids we require.
People who are meat eaters, but are looking for ways to reduce the amount of fat in their meals, can try eating more chicken. The leanest part of the chicken is the chicken breast, which has less than half the fat of a trimmed Choice grade T-bone steak. The fat in chicken is also less saturated than beef fat. However, eating the chicken with the skin doubles the amount of fat and saturated fat in the food. For this reason, chicken is best skinned before cooking.


Ingredients:
Skin-less Chicken breasts,legs or thighs - 1.5lbs
Celery - 3 stalks (cubed)
White onion - 1 (cubed)
Garlic - 4 to 6 cloves (crushed)
Ginger - 1 tbsp (diced)
Red chilies - 3 to 5 (diced, optional)
5 spices powder - a pinch (optional)
Light soy sauce - 2 tbsp
Sugar - 2 teaspoons
Low sodium Chicken soup stock - 1 to 2 cups


Directions:
Cut the chicken in bite sized pieces.

Mix with the diced ginger and red chilies. Add the celery, white onions, garlic in to the slow cooker.

Add in the chicken, and the rest of the ingredients.

Cook for 6 to 8 hours on low.


Special Diet: Gluten Free, High Protein, Low Calorie, Diabetic - Low Carb


Category: Slow Cooker!

Submitted By: OK In Health



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