Vegetarian Entrees

 

 

How to Steam Vegetables 

Print Friendly 

Description:
When I sit down to prepare my meals, I know for certain that vegetables will always find their way onto my table. Although I like to grill vegetables, steaming them is one of my preferred methods. By steaming a vegetable, its color, texture, and flavor is better retained, as is the vegetable’s nutritional content. Steaming is also one of the easiest ways to prepare vegetables, and can be done in minutes.


Ingredients:
You do not need any special equipment. Most people will have a saucepan, lid, and colander already in their kitchen, and that is all that is needed for steaming on a stovetop. Try to choose vegetable that are in season.


Directions:
Fill the pot with enough water so that is just barely reaches the bottom of the colander or steamer basket. Once the water comes to a boil, add vegetables and place a loose fitting lid on top to cover. If your lid is more fitted over the colander, position it so that one side hangs over the colander just enough to let the steam escape.

All vegetables will have different cooking times depending on their size and thickness. Below you will find some of the more commonly steamed vegetables and their cooking times for both stovetop.

Asparagus:
On the stovetop, asparagus are steamed approximately four minutes for thin spears. Add an extra minute or two for thicker spears.

Broccoli:
Broccoli florets are steamed on the stovetop about five minutes. Look for a dark color change and you will know when the broccoli is done.

Brussels Sprouts:
On the stovetop, Brussels spouts are steamed approximately ten minutes.

Carrots:
Carrots that are sliced about ¼” thick are steamed on the stovetop about six to eight minutes.


Cauliflower:
Cauliflower florets will steam on the stovetop in about six minutes.

Green Beans:
Steam green beans on the stovetop for about five minutes.

Peas:
Peas steamed on the stovetop take about three minutes.

Zucchini:
On the stovetop, steam zucchini for six to seven minutes.


Notes: Remember to add some good oil, like olive oil to bring out the flavour and also so your body can absorb and utilize the nutrients from your favorite vegetables.


Special Diet: Vegetarian, Low Fat, High Fibre, Low Calorie


Category: Vegetarian Entrees

Submitted By: OK In Health



Previous 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 Next
Connect with Us
facebook    twitter

Kelowna Wellness Fair 2019


Wellness Tip
Bean Power
Beans, also called legumes, are inexpensive and quite filling. The U.S. Dietary Guidelines recommends eating them several times each week. Red, black, pinto, or kidney beans all pack a nutritional punch. One-third cup of cooked beans has only 80 calories, no cholesterol, lots of complex carbohydrates, and little fat. They are also a great source of protein, full of B vitamins, potassium, and fiber. Experts believe that eating beans may reduce blood cholesterol, a leading cause of heart disease.


Maria’s Ireland Itinerary Planning Services


Wellness Directory
Being Wellness and Healing ~ Dylan Smeaton
Specialty: Body Talk
Being Wellness & Healing is a wellness & information community that specializes in the importance of holistic awareness and living for everyone. Offering certified BodyTalk treatments...
View Details


Ireland Sacred Druide Tour 2020


Event
Metamorphosis Class (Abbotsford)
Date: Sep 28, 2019
Location: Vancouver, Victoria & Across BC
Metamorphosis addresses unconscious tension. Learn a gentle touch practice to address this tension. We work on the spinal reflex points on the feet, hands, and head.
View Details


Greek Islands Tour - October 2019 - Host Maria O'Farrell Carr


Article
Addictions
Many of us do not understand why or how individuals become addicted to certain substances. There is often a mistaken assumption that the addictive habit can be overcome with sheer willpower. The reality is that many people do not have control over their addiction, and even if they want to stop, they can’t! The spiritual reason, according to Kryon (through Lee Carroll), is a lack of self-worth.
Full Article


Ireland Sacred Druide Tour 2020


Recipe
Dandelion and Tomato Salad
Category: Salads
Description: Pity the American dandelion. In countries across the world the dandelion is considered a delicious vegetable and is consumed with affection–and dandelion has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries. In America, it is most often cursed as an irksome weed and is pulled, poisoned and otherwise generally maligned.

Dandelion gets its name from the French "dents de lion", or lion's teeth, which describes the jagged edges on the leaves. The "lion" part might be there due to the fact that the fluffy yellow flowers of the plant resemble a lion's furry mane.
Dandelion greens are loaded with beta carotene, the carotenoid phytonutrient that is a precursor to vitamin A.
Dandelions help to support digestion.
Known to reduce swelling and inflammation.
Traditionally used as an anti-viral, treatment for gout, eczema, jaundice, and edema.
Function as both mild laxative and gentle diuretic properties to purify the blood and cleanse the system.

Dandelion greens have a reputation for bitterness, but they are nicely so, and the bitterness is balanced by a lovely spiciness similar to arugula. Mature greens can get pretty bitter, but this can be tamed by blanching them.
The time to harvest dandelion greens is early in the spring, when they are their youngest and before they flower. They can be harvested again in late fall as they loose some of their bitterness after a frost. Look for young dandelions growing in rich, moist soil, making sure not to forage close to roads. They taste fresh and easy to add to any salad!
This recipes is so simple to make.
Full Recipe


Maria’s Ireland Itinerary Planning Services