Vegetarian Entrees

 

 

Mushroom Risotto 

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Description:
Wild mushrooms are the best non-animal source of vitamin D going and some have the added benefit of vitamins B and C as well. They are also a good source of antioxidants such as polyphenols that have been linked with cancer-risk reduction and antiaging.
To prevent mushroom poisoning, mushroom gatherers need to be very intimately familiar with the mushrooms they intend to collect, including knowledge of the toxic species that look similar to these edible species. Best buy from a trusted health store or supermarket.


Ingredients:
1 cup Arborio rice ( or barley)
2 shallots, finely chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
4 cups of sliced wild mushrooms,
3 to 4 cups stock - veggie
½ cup grated parmesan cheese
½ cup whipping cream
1 tablespoon of olive oil
¾ teaspoon salt
¾ teaspoon ground black pepper
1 bunch cilantro, rough chopped.


Directions:
1. In a large skillet place oil, shallots and garlic, sauté gently till onion is tender.
2. Add rice and mix well with onion ensuring to coat each grain of rice in the oil.
3. Add the ½ the mushrooms and some stock, stirring constantly, the object is to have the rice absorb the stock before adding more stock.
4. Add seasoning and continue adding stock until rice is 2/3 rds cooked.
5. Add remaining mushrooms and more stock till rice is completely cooked and tender.
6. Add cream and cheese, mix well.
7. Serve with green salad and garnish with chopped cilantro.
8. Cooking the rice will take approximately 20 to 30 minutes.
Stirring the skillet constantly will ensure the rice stays separate and does not stick


Special Diet: Vegetarian


Category: Vegetarian Entrees

Submitted By: OK In Health



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Description: Pity the American dandelion. In countries across the world the dandelion is considered a delicious vegetable and is consumed with affection–and dandelion has been used for medicinal purposes for centuries. In America, it is most often cursed as an irksome weed and is pulled, poisoned and otherwise generally maligned.

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